Matchcom online dating Chatcity

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It is not a truth universally acknowledged, but a single man in possession of no fortune may still be in want of a wife.

At least that was the case for Gary Kremen, the founder of the online dating service

All Kremen got out of the transaction was ,000 from selling his company stock and a lifetime account on the site.

Over the next few years, a combination of joint ventures and technological innovation helped Match to flourish.

"People have become more willing to open their wallets to find love," says Mark Brooks, the editor of Online Personals Watch.com, a consulting firm for the online dating industry.

That's partially because Match's fees (currently .99 per month) are relatively modest, and it also helps, Brooks says, that the site has really "stocked its shelves" and continues to do so, with more than 20,000 singles registering on Match every day.

Blatt says such technology helps to increase the odds that two people will at least want to go out on a date with each other.

The idea came to him when he saw how much money local newspapers were making from personal ads, including his own.

Today, smart phones are Match's fastest-growing channel, according to Match CEO Greg Blatt.

"We're trying to be wherever our users are," whether in the waiting room at a doctor's office or in line at the grocery store, he says.

Then, in 2004, after Electric Classifieds (renamed Instant Objects) went out of business, Kremen essentially bought the company's million in debt for ,000 so that he could retrieve its valuable patent.

He then held a foreclosure sale and sold the same patent for

The idea came to him when he saw how much money local newspapers were making from personal ads, including his own.

Today, smart phones are Match's fastest-growing channel, according to Match CEO Greg Blatt.

"We're trying to be wherever our users are," whether in the waiting room at a doctor's office or in line at the grocery store, he says.

Then, in 2004, after Electric Classifieds (renamed Instant Objects) went out of business, Kremen essentially bought the company's $2 million in debt for $20,000 so that he could retrieve its valuable patent.

He then held a foreclosure sale and sold the same patent for $1.7 million.

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The idea came to him when he saw how much money local newspapers were making from personal ads, including his own.Today, smart phones are Match's fastest-growing channel, according to Match CEO Greg Blatt."We're trying to be wherever our users are," whether in the waiting room at a doctor's office or in line at the grocery store, he says.Then, in 2004, after Electric Classifieds (renamed Instant Objects) went out of business, Kremen essentially bought the company's $2 million in debt for $20,000 so that he could retrieve its valuable patent.He then held a foreclosure sale and sold the same patent for $1.7 million.

.7 million.

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